Open Letters To My Dear Brother#3

1st September 2017

Hello little bro!

How are you? Is it the right question to ask someone at that side of universe? I don’t know.

How strange it is, I never thought I will one day write it all addressing you. We were never so formal. Just one look in each other’s eyes and all talks done with one smile. That was how our relation worked.

Your smile was the most beautiful asset that you had right from your birth. When I saw you first time in hospital I was mesmerized to see such a lovely, fair and beautiful baby. You were very charming baby. Nurses used to take you in their arms and play with you.

The day we brought you and mom back at our grandparent’s home (in old subzi mandi old Delhi) from hospital was no less than a grand festival for us all. Parul and I was so embarrassed as Chacha (paternal uncle) called band team at home and was dancing and making others dance on its tune. Neighbors thought some wedding is going on. His happiness had no limit since a boy was born in our family after 28 years of his own birth.

What a grand welcome it was! No one usually call band and dhol on birth of a baby boy. But after all you were special right from birth.

Now come and see how your death has given him a blow so hard. He cries more than any of us remembering this all. Cursing himself to be one of those who gave shoulder to your body although it should be other way round. He has grown weak and heart broken. About mom and dad I can’t even write here. We never thought you came in our life just for 34 years. But filled our life with full of your unforgettable memories…

Full of grief
Your loving sis


Copyright© 2017 Meenakshi Sethi, Wings Of Poetry
All Rights Reserved

17 thoughts on “Open Letters To My Dear Brother#3

      1. I had a professor who was also a school district superintendent. He was very humble and spent all his time helping people. He and his wife had one child. He then wanted to have a “rainbow” family. He adopted 4 children, one Chinese boy, one black child, and two from other ethnic groups. He died of pancreatic cancer. In his funeral service, people wrote on cards of things he had done from them, so the family could read them.

        Liked by 1 person

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